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Excerpt taken from THE UFO CRASH/RETRIEVAL SYNDROME
Status Report II: New Sources, New Data
By Leonard H. Stringfield

Case A-10

In light of new information surfacing about an alleged crash and retrieval of an alien craft near Roswell, New Mexico, in 1947, the following case, published in Abstract #18 of my previous paper, is certainly not in itself unusual, but it merits review as it may provide useful testimony for researchers.

On April 7, 1978, Steve tom, NBC radio newsman, Chicago, and I were linked up by phone for an interview with a former Air Force Intelligence Officer, Major Jesse Marcel, residing in Houma, Louisiana. Major Marcel, I learned, shared some common ground with me. He had also served in the 5th Air Force in the Pacific Theater during World War II, and had been in several combat areas such as Leyte, Philippine Islands, where I had been assigned. The purpose of our call was to obtain, firsthand, the Major's confirmation of his role in the retrieval of an alleged crashed UFO northwest of Roswell, New Mexico, in the summer of 1947.

The debris of an apparent metallic aerial device, or craft, that had exploded in the air, or crashed, was first made known by a sheep rancher who found fragments of metal and other material on his 8,000-acre property. When he informed the Air Force base in Roswell of his discovery, Major Marcel and aides were dispatched to the area for investigation. There, he found many metal fragments and what appeared to be "parchment" strewn in a 1-mile-square area. "The metal fragments," said the Major, "varied in size up to 6 inches in length, but were of the thickness of tinfoil. The fragments were unusual," he continued, "because they were of great strength. They could not be bent or broken, no matter what pressure we applied by hand."

The area was thoroughly checked, he said, but no fresh impact depressions were found in the sand. The area was not radioactive. The fragments, he added, were transported by a military carry-all to the Air Base in Roswell and from that point, he was instructed by General Roger A. Ramey, Chief of the Air Defense Command, to deliver the "hardware" to Ft. Worth, to be forwarded to Wright-Patterson Field for analysis. When the press learned of this retrieval operation, and wanted a story, Major Marcel stated, "To get them off my back, I told them we were recovering a downed weather balloon."

Since the Major's story got publicity, it has been said by some researchers that the retrieved fragments were possibly a part of the Skyhook balloon, at that time classified as Secret. On October 5, 1979, I called him and got this comment:

"The material I gathered did not resemble anything off a balloon. A balloon, of any kind, could not have exploded and spread its debris over such a broad area....I was told later that a military team from my base was sent to rake the entire area."

 

COMMENT:

If there were entities aboard, they could have been destroyed in what appeared to be a violent aerial explosion.

Since the successful release of their book, The Philadelphia Experiment, in 1979, which uncovers new data about another legendary mystery concerning a warship being invisibly teleported during a Navy experiment in 1943, the authors, Charles Berlitz and William Moore, are ready for another expose far removed from sea lore. The theme concerns an alleged crash of a UFO in 1947 near Roswell, New Mexico. Thus, there may be a tie-in with the account offered by Major Jesse Marcel.

Bill Moore, persuasive and methodical in his probing skills, told me during a private meeting in Cincinnati in July 1979, that he had uncovered some good firsthand data about the 1947 crash. In trust, he related some of his material and if his informants are as reliable as he alleges, then the Air Force long ago had evidence to back up and make policy about the incursive UFO.
 
No infringement intended. For educational purposes only.