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Flying orange orb witnessed by two women in New Brunswick

Date: February 9, 2003
Location: Indian Mountain, New Brunswick, Canada

It was a clear, cold early February morning when Amy Wilbur saw a flying orange orb in the sky. "It was a round orange ball in the sky hovering across the road and field to the west in front of our house," she said. "It was bright and light orange, the edges even brighter, a red-orange." The orange ball moved very slowly, downward and diagonally, said Wilbur.


Amy Wilbur and dad Ken peer off toward where Amy and her mom witnessed a UFO.

Source: Times & Transcript, October 30, 2003 (New Brunswick, Canada)

N.B. UFO encounter explored: Sighting of unidentified flying object over Indian Mountain part of Life Network documentary

JORGE BARRERA
Times & Transcript Staff

It was a clear, cold early February morning when Amy Wilbur saw a flying orange orb in the sky.

Now, the only way she can describe it is by what it was not.

"It wasn't a fiery ball, it was solid. It almost looked like the moon, but the moon was on the other side of the sky," said Wilbur. "It couldn't be a meteor because I've seen lots of those."

Only one explanation remains as to what hovered over the tree line just off Indian Mountain Road on that winter night: an alien spacecraft.

"I tried to reason with everything else it could be," said the 18-year-old artist.

Wilbur is not alone. Last year, there were 483 reported sightings of Unidentified Flying Objects in Canada, four of those sightings came from New Brunswick, according to the web-based Canadian UFO survey which tallies sightings dating back to 1989.

The website is maintained by Manitoba resident Chris Rutkowski, one of the country’s leading UFO authorities.

This is not the first time an encounter of the Third Kind in New Brunswick has garnered national attention.

Last January, a number of Inkerman residents reported seeing a diamond-shaped alien spacecraft in the sky. The community sits about 20 kilometres southwest of Shippagan.

Wilbur has since painted what she saw that morning at around 2 a.m. In the painting, amid the swirling deep dark blues of early morning, an orange ball, like a giant balloon, peeks through ghost-like trees.

"My mom agrees my painting matches our sighting," said Wilbur.

She had just gone to bed on the morning of Feb. 9 when her mother and a friend woke her to look at something through the window. Wilbur said she couldn’t really see it through her bedroom window and went to the living room to get a better view.

"It was a round orange ball in the sky hovering across the road and field to the west in front of our house," she said. "It was bright and light orange, the edges even brighter, a red-orange."

Wilbur, who at one point used binoculars, said the surface of the object was very smooth, lacking any "pock-marks of lights, metal sheen or anything at all but smooth orange."

The orange ball moved very slowly, downward and diagonally, said Wilbur. It slid silently behind the trees, pausing for a moment, before disappearing.

"It went straight down, quickly," she said. "About five or six times faster than when the sun sets."

Thinking back, Wilbur said it was "pretty", but during the encounter she said it gave her very negative feelings.

"None of the traffic that had been going by drove down the road the entire duration of the sighting," she said. "It started up again only minutes after it disappeared. It’s probably a coincidence, but it added to the feeling that there was something wrong here."

Wilbur, who had half-believed in aliens before, said the experience made her a true believer.

"I’m more willing to believe other people’s stories," she said.

Many might scoff at the idea that aliens have visited New Brunswick, but Stanton T. Friedman said those people have to open up their minds to the facts.

Friedman, who wrote Crash at Corona: The Definitive Story of the Roswell Incident, said non-believers base their opposition on three things.

"First, there is the ignorance of the data," said Friedman. "The second problem is the fear of ridicule and the belief that you can’t get there from here."

The emergence of extraterrestrial sightings began in full force after the end of the Second World War, said Friedman. The use of an atomic bomb, rockets and radars probably alerted more advanced life forms that the earth was worth keeping tabs on.

"I go on one assumption about advanced civilizations. They are concerned about their own survival and about security," he said.

A civilization as dangerous as the earth’s, which Friedman said is constantly embroiled in "tribal warfare", developing technological capabilities to leave the planet could cause other civilizations great consternation.

"They are here to quarantine us," he said.

 

Source: http://www.ufoevidence.org/cases/case886.htm
 
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